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29th Jan 2001
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Employees are at risk of giving poor performance at work because of high levels of caffeine intake according to research by mineral water company, Volvic.

Drinking 350mg of caffeine, roughly the equivalent to three cups of coffee and a cup of tea, can cause a lapse in concentration and increased stress levels, according to the research.

Dr David Lewis, a stress specialist, analysed the findings for Volvic, and is calling for the traditional morning and afternoon work-breaks to be scrapped. He said, "Our clinical research found that a high intake of caffeine (more than 350mg during the working day), acts as a powerful diuretic and causes people to visit the toilet more frequently, which can lead to performance zapping dehydration. This coupled with the powerful stimulating effect of caffeine, increases stress and causes failure in concentration."

In the survey of 1,000 office workers, 76% said that they drank tea, coffee or caffeinated cola more than three times a day, with one in 20 having more than 10 drinks. 93% drank at least one caffeinated drink during the day.

Of those who drank more than three caffeinated drinks a day, over half said that had stress-related problems. Nearly 80% of those surveyed drank a caffeinated drink first thing in the morning or mid-morning - times associated with peak stress levels for the majority of workers.

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By User deleted
02nd Feb 2001 10:29

Has Dr Lewis ever worked in an office? Does he have any idea of the riots that would break out if his proposal of scrapping morning and afternoon work-breaks were to be implemented by managers? Perhaps he should try reading Dilbert, and he can then get some more crazy ideas.
It's one thing to point out a problem, another to find acceptable solutions. Most people probably do drink more coffee than is good for them, though how Dr Lewis can be so sure this is linked to increased stress is not apparent. Was there a control goup who drank no coffee and who were less stressed?
Perhaps he should have just said "Take more (Volvic) water with it!"

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By AnonymousUser
03rd Feb 2001 00:30

Interesting points raised by Barry and I would imagine Dr Lewis has some explanations which would be beneficial in bringing some clarity.

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