Sales and Marketing Director Vivup
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How to engage employees in wellbeing strategies

10th Oct 2017
Sales and Marketing Director Vivup
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We all know that we should be living healthier more active lives, but even when we’re presented with the tools to do it, it can be difficult to get going.

Healthcare workers are no exception. Although they may be even more aware of the consequences of poor health and wellbeing, they can struggle just as much as anyone else to find the motivation to improve their health and happiness.

Therefore, introducing wellbeing strategies into the workplace, such as providing smoking cessation courses, cycle to work schemes or other incentives is not enough. You’ve got to find ways to get employees to engage with them long term.

Here are Vivup's suggestions for getting better employee engagement with your wellbeing strategies.

Step 1: Choose the right wellbeing incentives

Are you offering the right incentives? Wellbeing schemes need to be aligned with your employees. For organisations with a multi-generational workforce this means offering lots of options and tailoring incentives to different age groups and the individual. It’s important to identify the key wellbeing strategies that will deliver the biggest benefits to your team.

Step 2: Raise awareness of the options

With the right types of wellbeing strategies in place, the next step is to promote them. The prescriptive approach is not to be recommended. Instead it’s important to raise awareness of what’s available, and guide employees towards the options that are most relevant to them.

Step 3: Recruit wellbeing ambassadors

There will always be some employees who are more enthusiastic about health and wellbeing than others. They will be ‘early adopters’ of your incentives and can make great ambassadors to encourage other staff to also get involved. Try to find wellbeing ambassadors that other employees will relate to – the fitness enthusiast who runs marathons every weekend is probably not the best candidate!

Step 4: Devise ways to measure and reward success

Achievable goals are a helpful way to keep members of staff engaged with your wellbeing strategies. While an employee may have a big goal such as losing 5 stone or running 5K, it’s the little achievements along the way that will keep them focused. There are plenty of wellbeing apps available that can be used to measure improvements. How about setting your department a target of a combined number of steps to take each week? Goals don’t have to be individual, a team effort creates a supportive environment and everyone can get involved whatever their fitness levels.

Step 5: Keep motivating employees

What happens after an employee signs up to a wellbeing scheme? For example, if they stop smoking after engaging with your programme? Unfortunately, a percentage of people will take up smoking again, so it’s important to find ways to reduce this possibility and also support staff if they do. The next step may be to encourage staff to engage with another wellbeing strategy, such as to take up cycling. This will give them an alternative to smoking, a way to de-stress and also use their newfound lung capacity for exercise! Think about what other wellbeing incentives can be used as a next step or in conjunction with others.

Getting staff to engage with your wellbeing strategies needs to be an on-going process. By adopting the steps above, I think you will find it easier to encourage employees to get involved and stay involved long term.

 

 

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