5 Practical ways to address employee engagement issues.

5 Practical ways to address employee engagement issues.

 

Why? Because we're not waving but drowning!

In what many would see as a "no s**t Sherlock" declaration, the CIPD announced today that there's seemingly an age-related engagement issue undermining UK business.

This is just the latest in the steady-cascade of dire engagement statistics from all the major HR research houses.

Rather than describe the water to the drowning man, here are some practical suggestions for addressing these problems, all as ever based on recent client experience:

1. Measure what you treasure: We've criticised the measurement industry which has grown up around employee engagement, largely on the grounds that the processes are all too often too cumbersome and there's far too great a lag between recognition of the problem and action. When directors are obsessed with quarterly reporting and expect to move on every couple of years, what's the use of a bi-annual staff survey?

We've also spoken in the past however, about the need for some form of measurement to win round the left-brained, data-worshipping cynics and to create a stake in the ground from which improvement can be tracked.

It's far better however, to ask a few powerful questions and take swift action to address the issues highlighted. It sends out a signal that the leaders care, especially if they can see swift results. After all, there's usually time to dig deeper at a later stage and to involve more people in that process.

2. Pull together a brand coalition: Sustainable brands are built on sustainable stakeholder involvement inside and out and side to side. Constructing and maintaining a united and consistent picture of the business is very important if the business is to back up the promises made about the brand. This can't happen in isolation, however, and needs at least HR; Marketing and Comms working in concert to address the process and behavioural challenges.

3. Think beehive, think culture: I can't think of a board room where "the way we do things" isn't tabled daily. Yet so few attempt to clarify what that means in practice, usually fearing the consequences of shaking the beehive. Organisations are the sum of the behaviour of the people who work for them. You can't engage people unless you understand them. Involvement is key to engagement, so find a way to understand the current norms and then work with the decision makers to create a compelling picture of the culture required to deliver the goals, strategy and vision and an engagement programme to bring it to life, role modelling that desired culture as you go. If in doubt, ask a trusted advisor to lend a hand in shaping and facilitating the journey.

4. Lead by example: It's tough at the top. But that's what you're paid for. Remember how you used to look to your leaders for cues about how to behave, and how not to? That never changes. Yes, organisations have had to adapt to prevailing social norms and become more democratic and affiliative in leadership style. So-called social media and the communication revolution is going to ensure that this trend continues. The modern manager simply has to lad by example if they're to sustain a career within a sustainable business. Values-based leadership is a powerful development strategy, as is mentoring and hugely cost-effective. These are tough times but how are leadership development budgets or even personal development budgets being spent where you work?

And what's the opportunity cost of a disengaged workforce?

5. Appreciate the power of appreciative comms:  Last but not least, conscripted armies of favourites don't build sustainable brands. Cynics don't destroy them either. Brands are undermined by a million small cuts; insidiousness and passivity leading to what I call "creeping brand death" like the spreading darkness in The Never Ending Story. The thriving brands, however, have champions everywhere in all shapes and sizes who feel connected because they believe in what they're hearing via the internal communication channels and their values resonate with what they experience at work not what they hear the leaders saying. So be appreciative and start actively seeking out examples of best practice behaviour that exemplifies the business you want to see and celebrate it. Good news is infectious, especially in dark days.

If you would like to know more about the detail underpinning these 5 approaches which are all based upon recent case studies or would prefer a confidential chat about the engagement issues you're facing, please contact Ian. 

 

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